Conditioners for African-American Hair: Aspects to Consider

Conditioners for African-American Hair
To keep African-American hair looking beautiful, healthy, and shiny, proper conditioning plays a very important part of the hair care regime. HairGlamourista posts the best ways to condition this hair type.
HairGlamourista Staff
Last Updated: Feb 27, 2018
Using a conditioner helps protect your hair from several damaging elements like dust, pollution, sun, and dryness. A hair conditioner will moisturize and provide the necessary nutrition to your scalp, which would ultimately lead to healthier and stronger hair. Today, if you visit the shampoo and conditioner section of your local store, you are bound to be overwhelmed by the wide variety of choices available in the hair care segment. So, how would you pick the right conditioner that suits your hair type?

Caring for any type of hair requires washing and using a safe and suitable conditioner to retain its texture. African-American hair tends to be more dry and brittle than other types of hair, and hence can be difficult to manage if not maintained properly.

Here, we have listed out some points to consider before choosing a suitable conditioner, and also provided a list of popular conditioners suited to this hair type.

Selecting a Conditioner
What most of us tend to do while selecting a conditioner is to look at the brand. While that is not completely wrong, there are other aspects that you have to take into consideration. It is important to read the labels of the conditioners to make sure what you are getting and how it will help you. The following are a few points to remember while choosing a conditioner for black hair.
  • Avoid products that contain any of the following: Isopropyl alcohol, methyl, propyl, butyl, ethylparaben, petrolatum and mineral oil and sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate. This is because these products, instead of maintaining or improving, can actually ruin African-American hair.
  • Look for a conditioner that contains rosemary, coconut, jojoba, olive, and other natural additives. Using a conditioner that contains natural ingredients is ideal, as a chemical conditioner would spoil the texture of this hair type and make them dry.
  • Always use a cream-based conditioner instead of a gel-based one. Moisture is extremely important for curly black hair, which is best provided by a cream-based conditioner.
  • A lot of hair care professionals suggest using a leave-in conditioner. This is because leave-in conditioners moisturize the scalp for a longer time, and also protect the hair from the elements and pollution.
Here are some popular conditioners that work wonders for African-American hair.
  • WEN Cleansing Conditioner
  • KeraCare Humecto Creme Conditioner
  • Carol's Daughter Rosemary Mint Clarifying Conditioner
  • Redken Extreme Anti-Snap Leave-in Conditioner
  • TRESemme Naturals Nourishing Moisture Conditioner

Homemade Conditioners
If you're not to keen on buying a conditioner that may or may not contain harmful ingredients, you can simply make one at home. Here are two recipes of homemade conditioners, check them out.

Olive Oil and Eggs: Start by mixing two eggs with 2 teaspoons of olive oil. If your have long hair, you'll have to add another egg. Combine this mixture thoroughly, then apply it to your dampened hair. Put on a shower cap (plastic), as you'll have to retain this homemade conditioner for around 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, wash your hair till the conditioner is gone.

Mayonnaise: Apply regular full-fat mayonnaise to your hair (damp), and let it stay for 30 minutes. You could cover your hair with a shower cap to avoid any spilling. After the said time, wash your hair thoroughly, and dry it. That's it! Using mayonnaise helps moisturize your hair, and makes it soft and shiny.
These were some useful tips to select a conditioner for African-American hair. So, say no to dry, damaged, and curly hair; use the right mix hair care products to keep your braids moist, Afros soft, frizzes tamed, and twists in place. Also, don't forget to try a homemade conditioner.
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